Administering medication to patients should carefully look and must be in the specification of the physician’s order. Improper administration of medication can cause harm to patients. The accusation of such negligence is common in nursing care. You just need a nurse attorney before dealing with accusation cases.

An incident happened on or about September 23, 2018, and October 3, 2018, while the RN was employed at a hospital in Midland, Texas, the RN administered Hydrocodone and Oxycodone to four patients, without assessing the patients’ pain level. The RN’s conduct unnecessarily exposed the patients to a risk of harm from ineffective pain management.

While on or about September 24, 2018, the RN inappropriately administered Hydrocodone and Morphine to a patient at the same time. This RN’s conduct unnecessarily exposed the patient to a risk of harm from ineffective pain management, and was likely to injure the patient in that failing to administer pain medications as ordered by the physician, could result in the patient suffering from adverse reactions.

Another incident occurs on or about October 2, 2018, through October 4, 2018, the RN administered Oxycodone to a patient outside the parameters of the physician’s order. The physician’s orders stated that Patient LG was to receive Oxycodone if Tramadol was not effective. The patient’s MAR does not reflect that Tramadol was ever administered to Patient LG. The RN’s conduct unnecessarily exposed the patient to a risk of harm from ineffective pain management, and was likely to injure the patient in that failing to administer pain medications as ordered by the physician, could result in the patient suffering from adverse reactions.

As a response to those incidents above, the RN admits that she became careless with her charting and with her medication pulls/returns. The RN states she was overloaded and is strained from work and made a habit of aggressively withdrawing medication and put it in a password-protected drawer of her personal rolling computer. The RN added that she was often pressured to immediately clock out after giving a report which cut down on the amount of time to finish charting. The RN states that she would never put her career at risk just to divert or use drugs.

As a conclusion to the actions made by the RN, wherein the information had produced the evidence which is sufficient and are the basis to the decision made by the Board.

She failed to hire a nurse attorney to fully defend her case and had led to this decision of the Board.

Do you have questions about the Texas Board of Nursing disciplinary process? Contact The Law Office of RN License Attorney Yong J. An for a confidential consultation by calling or texting 24/7 at (832) 428-5679 and ask for a nurse attorney.